Former Fiji Nationals Invited to Apply for Gates Millennium Scholars Asian & Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund

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The Fiji Embassy in US should ideally be looking for educated and overeducated Fiji Nationals and recruit them. We have a severe problem of brain drain in the country with ethnic coups and the more educated and privileged Indians settling abroad. And yet, the country does not seem to care!

The Gates Millennium Scholars (GMS) program has launched the 2008 scholarship and nomination process and the Fiji Embassy in DC has been asked to assist in identifying outstanding students who are former Fiji nationals but now US citizen or permanent residents with demonstrated leadership abilities and significant financial need to apply for the GMS scholarship.

The Gates Millennium Scholars program, established in 1999, was initially funded by a 1 billion dollar grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The goal of GMS is to promote academic excellence and to provide an opportunity for outstanding minority students with significant financial need to reach their highest potential by:
• Reducing financial barriers for African-American, Hispanic American, American Indian/Alaska Native and Asian Pacific Islander American students with high academic and leadership promise who have a significant financial need
• Increasing the representation of these target groups in the disciplines of education, engineering, library science, mathematics, public health, and the sciences, where these groups are severely underrepresented
• Developing a diversified cadre of future leaders for America by facilitating successful completion of bachelors, masters and doctoral degrees
• Providing seamless support from undergraduate through doctoral programs, for students selected as Gates Scholars entering target disciplines.

The United Negro College Fund (UNCF) is the administrator of the GMS program. To reach, coordinate, and support Asian Pacific Islander Americans, UNCF has partnered with the Asian & Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund to assist in implementing the program.

The Asian & Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund (APIASF) is the primary national effort to provide scholarships for deserving Asian & Pacific Islander American students. APIASF currently offers two scholarships for students that will be enrolled for the first-time at colleges or universities. APIASF mission is to forge partnerships building a national Asian and Pacific Islander American Scholarship organization that supports and encourages all Asian and Pacific Islander American students to pursue higher education, thereby developing future leaders who will contribute back to their communities, and ultimately, strengthening.

Writing recently to the Fiji Embassy in Washington Mr Ryan Edgar Outreach Coordinator, Gates Millennium Scholars Asian & Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund – APIASF wrote, “We welcome your help in identifying outstanding students with demonstrated leadership abilities and significant financial need to apply for the GMS scholarship.”

Students are eligible to be considered for a GMS scholarship if they:
• Are African American, American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian Pacific Islander American or Hispanic American
• Are a citizen, national or legal permanent resident of the United States
• Have attained a cumulative high school GPA of 3.3 on a 4.0 scale (unweighted) or have earned a GED
• Will be enrolling for the first time at a U.S. accredited college or university as a full-time, degree-seeking, first-year student in fall 2008
• Have demonstrated leadership abilities through participation in community service, extracurricular, or other activities
• Meet the federal Pell Grant eligibility criteria
• Have completed and submitted all three required forms (Nominee Personal Information Form, Nominator Form, and Recommender Form) by the deadline

Former Fiji nationals who are now US citizens or permanent residents and who meet the above criteria may apply for the scholarships. The deadline for online submissions is January 11, 2008 at 11:59 pm EST; Paper submissions must be postmarked no later than December 31, 2007.   You can visit www.gmsp.org and select the “Apply Online” tab to start the online nomination process. Further information on the Scholarships may be obtained from the following:

Gates Millennium Scholars
P.O. Box 10500
Fairfax, VA 22031-8044
Toll-Free Phone: 1-877-690-4677
http://www.gmsp.org

Asian & Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund
1900 L Street, NW, Suite 210
Washington, DC 20036-5002
Phone. (202) 986-6892
Fax. (202) 530-0643
http://www.apiasf.org

PL gives $50000 to establish scholarship fund for illegal immigrants

Posted on by Prerna in Education, Immigration | 1 Comment

Wealthy entrepeneur has given $50000 to support the Dream of students who are victims of circumstances beyond their control.

Opinion

DREAM Act should become a reality for kids

http://www.azstarnet.com/allheadlines/202264

Our view: Illegal-immigrant students should not pay for parents’ transgressions

Tucson, Arizona | Published: 09.21.2007

Congress may soon have the opportunity to stop the systematic punishment of illegal-immigrant children for the sins of their parents.

Sen. Richard Durbin, D-Ill., is planning to reintroduce the Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors Act as an amendment to a Pentagon spending bill that is being debated in Congress this week.

The DREAM Act, which was part of the comprehensive immigration-reform bill that failed this summer, would give the children of illegal immigrants a path toward citizenship if they attend college for at least two years or serve honorably in the military for at least two years.

The measure would be good for the United States, as it would boost student ranks in states like Arizona, where young illegal immigrants who want to attend college often cannot afford to because of state laws. The act would also encourage young illegal immigrants to pursue higher education or careers in the military.

The measure would be especially significant in Arizona because state voters last year approved Proposition 300, which requires illegal-immigrant students to pay out-of-state tuition rather than the more affordable in-state rate.

University tuition for students classified as in-state residents costs roughly $5,000 a year, while out-of-state tuition is more than three times higher at about $16,000 per year.

As we have stated on these pages previously, Proposition 300 created a mean-spirited law that unfairly punishes young adults who entered the country illegally but involuntarily.

The United States is a nation of laws, but children should not be punished for the actions of their parents.

Many illegal-immigrant students who are of college age came to this country as toddlers or grade-schoolers. The United States is the only country they know. For them, Mexico, to give one example, would be the foreign country, even though they might be Mexican citizens.

Proposition 300 viciously makes it harder for these students to become well-educated, taxpaying adults.

Some individuals and groups have stepped up to help illegal-immigrant students pursue college degrees.

Arizona State University President Michael Crow, for one, has earmarked funds from private donors to help about 200 illegal-immigrant students meet the higher tuition costs, the Arizona Republic reported.

However, state Treasurer Dean Martin, who as a legislator was the main proponent of Proposition 300, is asking for the Board of Regents to investigate whether Crow is following state law in assisting the students.

University of Arizona spokesman Johnny Cruz said six students affected by Proposition 300 are receiving more aid so that they can remain in school. UA President Robert Shelton said the money is coming from private donations.

Meanwhile, Tucson businessman Paul Lindsey has donated $50,000 to establish a scholarship fund that will help illegal-immigrant students attend Pima Community College.

A full, 15-credit-hour course load at Pima College costs about $700 for in-state students and about $3,500 for out-of-state students.

We applaud the efforts to help illegal-immigrant students who might otherwise not be able to earn college degrees and we are hopeful those private efforts expand.

However, Proposition 300 could be effectively negated if the DREAM Act is approved by Congress. We encourage Arizona’s senators and representatives to support Sen. Durbin’s amendment.

The United Negro College Fund has a slogan, “A Mind is a Terrible Thing to Waste.” That slogan should apply to young people of all races.

CSPA and Lawful Permanent Residents

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For those children that have aged out or are about to age-out thanks to the most ludicrous U.S. immigration laws.Please DO NOT fail to see a lawyer and get an opinion about avenues to pursue family reunification ESPECIALLY if you are a beneficiary of Section 245i; you NEVER lose your Section 245i benefits. Stepping out of the country after you age out is an automatic 10 year ban that would NOT be waived unless you show extreme circumstances.

Children of Permanent Residents and Applicants for Permanent Residency The CSPA also covers the children of Legal Permanent Residents (LPR), and the children of the aliens who are in the process of filing immigration petitions. Two scenarios apply:

1. Children who have been directly sponsored by their LPR parents under the Family-based Immigration 2A category; and

2. Children who are accompanying or joining family-sponsored, employment-based, and diversity immigrant parents

· Determination of the Age of the Alien Child

In accordance with the CSPA, the age of the alien child is determined on the date on which an immigrant visa number becomes available, minus the number of days the petition was pending with the USCIS (formerly INS).

· Immigrant Visa Availability

Immigrant visa availability requires both a current priority date and an approved immigration petition. The Department of State publishes a Visa Bulletin every month. The current priority dates are applicable on the first day of every month. Therefore, the alien child’s age should be determined on the first date of the month that the priority date becomes current.

· Pending

“Pending” refers to the status of a case during the period of time starting when the I-130 or I-140 petition is filed with the USCIS until it is approved.

Therefore, the formula for calculating the age of the alien child involves two dates. One is the age of the alien child on the date on which an immigration visa becomes available (1); the other is the number of days the immigration petition is pending with the USCIS (2).

The age of the alien child = (1) – (2)

For example:

Jason is an LPR. He filed an immigration petition for his son, Sam, an alien child, when Sam was 18 years old. This petition was approved after it was pending with the USCIS for exactly 1 year (2). When the immigrant visa number became available for Sam, he was 21 years, 11 months old (1). Thus, Sam’s age for immigration purposes under the CSPA is determined by age (1) minus pending time (2). 21 years 11 months – 1 year = 20 years 11 months. Sam’s age is locked at 20 years 11 months old. Sam is still regarded as a “child” under the CSPA.

For another example:

Donald files an I-140 petition under the EB-1(A) “alien of extraordinary ability” category when his daughter Mary is 20 years, 11 months old. The case is approved after 6 months, and at that time, Mary is 21 years and 5 months old. Immigrant visa numbers are available at the time Donald’s immigration petition is approved. Mary’s age at the time is reduced by 6 months, which equals 20 years 11 months. As a derivative beneficiary of Donald’s immigration petition, Mary’s age is locked at 20 years, 11 months.

· Acquiring Permanent Residency

However, this provision applies only if the alien child has applied to acquire permanent residence within one year after the visa number becomes available.

Thus, in the above example, in order to take advantage of the CSPA Mary has to apply for adjustment of status (if she is in the U.S.), or apply for an immigrant visa (if she is abroad), within one year of the visa number becoming available.

· Retention of Priority Date

If the age of an alien is determined under the above calculation to be 21 years or older, the alien’s petition shall automatically be converted to the appropriate category and the alien shall retain the original priority date issued upon receipt of the original petition.

For example:

The Labor Certification application that was submitted on John’s behalf on January 1, 2000 was approved on December 31, 2000. His employer subsequently submits an I-140 (EB-2) immigration petition on John’s behalf on January 1, 2002. At that time, John’s son, Junior, is 20 years and 7 months old. John’s I-140 petition is pending for six months and is finally approved on July 1, 2002, when Junior is 21 years and 7 months old. Visa numbers for EB-2 are available for John on July 1, 2002. Under the CSPA, Junior’s age is fixed as of the date that a visa number becomes available minus the number of days that the I-140 was pending. Because John’s I-140 was pending for six months, these six months must be subtracted from Junior’s age at the time the visa number became available (July 1, 2002). Subtracting six months from Junior’s age of 21 years, 7 months on July 1, 2002, Junior’s age is fixed at 21 years and 1 month. Even with the Child Status Protection Act, Junior still ages out and may not adjust his status at this time. However, he will automatically be reclassified to an appropriate category, family-based 2B, and retain his father’s original priority date, January 1, 2000, which is the date John’s employer filed John’s Labor Certification application.

The magical section 245(i)

Posted on by Prerna in Immigration | Leave a comment

This law makes most lawyers recommend an illegal or out of status person to stay in the country because they would be privileged to adjust status at any time that their priority date becomes available and they have a visa petition available to them.

The actual explanation of Section 245i from the UCSIS site

I will soon post some case law concerning the amount of denials and approvals under the 245(i) channel.

—————————————————————————–

Actual text Courtesy 245i
Sec. 245.2 Application.

(a) General

(1) Jurisdiction . USCIS has jurisdiction to adjudicate an application for adjustment of status filed by any alien, unless the immigration judge has jurisdiction to adjudicate the application under 8 CFR 1245.2(a)(1). (Paragraph (a) (1) revised 5/12/06; 71 FR 27585 ) (Amended 7/1/94; 59 FR 33903 ) (Paragraph (a)(1) revised effective 4/1/97; 62 FR 10312 )

(2) Proper filing of application

(i) Under section 245 . (A) An immigrant visa must be immediately available in order for an alien to properly file an adjustment application under section 245 of the Act See § 245.1(g)(1) to determine whether an immigrant visa is immediately available. (Paragraph (a)(2)(i) revised 7/31/02; 67 FR 49561 )

(B) If, at the time of filing, approval of a visa petition filed for classification under section 201(b)(2)(A)(i) , section 203(a) or section 203(b)(1) , (2) or (3) of the Act would make a visa immediately available to the alien beneficiary, the alien beneficiary’s adjustment application will be considered properly filed whether submitted concurrently with or subsequent to the visa petition, provided that it meets the filing requirements contained in parts 103 and 245 . For any other classification, the alien beneficiary may file the adjustment application only after the Service has approved the visa petition.

(C) A visa petition and an adjustment application are concurrently filed only if:

( 1 ) The visa petitioner and adjustment applicant each file their respective form at the same time, bundled together within a single mailer or delivery packet, with the proper filing fees on the same day and at the same Service office, or;

( 2 ) the visa petitioner filed the visa petition, for which a visa number has become immediately available, on, before or after July 31, 2002, and the adjustment applicant files the adjustment application, together with the proper filing fee and a copy of the Form I-797, Notice of Action, establishing the receipt and acceptance by the Service of the underlying Form I-140 visa petition, at the same Service office at which the visa petitioner filed the visa petition, or;

( 3 ) The visa petitioner filed the visa petition, for which a visa number has become immediately available, on, before, or after July 31, 2002, and the adjustment applicant files the adjustment application, together with proof of payment of the filing fee with the Service and a copy of the Form I-797 Notice of Action establishing the receipt and acceptance by the Service of the underlying Form I-140 visa petition, with the Immigration Court or the Board of Immigration Appeals when jurisdiction lies under parag raph (a)(1) of this section.

(ii) Under the Act of November 2, 1966 . An application for the benefits of section 1 of the Act of November 2, 1966 is not properly filed unless the applicant was inspected and admitted or paroled into the United States subsequent to January 1, 1959. An applicant is ineligible for the benefits of the Act of November 2, 1966 unless he or she has been physically present in the United States for one year (amended from two years by the Refugee Act of 1980).

(3) Submission of documents — (i) General. A separate application shall be filed by each applicant for benefits under section 245 , or the Act of November 2, 1966. Each application shall be accompanied by an executed Form G – 325A, if the applicant has reached his or her 14th birthday. Form G – 325A shall be considered part of the application. An application under this part shall be accompanied by the document specified in the instructions which are attached to the application.

(ii) Under section 245 . An application for adjustment of status is submitted on Form I – 485, Application for Permanent Residence. The application must be accompanied by the appropriate fee as explained in the instructions to the application.

(iii) Under section 245(i) . An alien who seeks adjustment of status under the provisions of section 245(i) of the Act must file Form I-485, with the required fee. The alien must also file Supplement A to Form I-485, with any required additional sum. (Added 10/1/94; 59 FR 51091 )

(iv) Under the Act of November 2, 1966 . An application for adjustment of status is made on Form I – 485A. The application must be accompanied by Form I – 643, Health and Human Services Statistical Data Sheet. The application must include a clearance from the local police jurisdiction for any area in the United States when the applicant has lived for six months or more since his or her 14th birthday. (Redesignated as (iv) 10/1/94; 59 FR 51091 )

(4) Effect of departure

(i) General . The effect of a departure from the United States is dependent upon the law under which the applicant is applying for adjustment.

(ii) Under section 245 of the Act . (A) The departure from the United States of an applicant who is under exclusion, deportation, or removal proceedings shall be deemed an abandonment of the application constituting grounds for termination of the proceeding by reason of the departure. Except as provided in paragraph (a)(4)(ii)(B) and (C) of this section, the departure of an applicant who is not under exclusion, deportation, or removal proceedings shall be deemed an abandonment of the application constituting grounds for termination of any pending application for adjust ment of status, unless the applicant was previously granted advance parole by the Service for such absences, and was inspected upon returning to the United States. If the adjustment application of an individual granted advance parole is subsequently denied the individual will be treated as an applicant for admission, and subject to the provisions of section 212 and 235 of the Act. (Paragraph (a)(4)(ii) revised effective 7/1/99; 64 FR 29208 )

(B) The travel outside of the United States by an applicant for adjustment who is not under exclusion, deportation, or removal proceedings shall not be deemed an abandonment of the application if he or she was previously granted advance parole by the Service for such absences, and was inspected and paroled upon returning to the United States. If the adjustment of status application of such individual is subsequently denied, he or she will be treated as an applicant for admission, and subject to the provisio ns of section 212 and 235 of the Act.

(C) The travel outside of the United States by an applicant for adjustment of status who is not under exclusion, deportation, or removal proceeding and who is in lawful H-1 or L-1 status shall not be deemed an abandonment of the application if, upon returning to this country, the alien remains eligible for H or L status, is coming to resume employment with the same employer for whom he or she had previously been authorized to work as an H-1 or L-1 nonimmigrant, and, is in possession of a valid H or L visa ( if required) and the original I-797 receipt notice for the application for adjustment of status. The travel outside of the United States by an applicant for adjustment of status who is not under exclusion, deportation, or removal proceeding and who is in lawful H-4 or L-2 status shall not be deemed an abandonment of the application if the spouse or parent of such alien through whom the H-4 or L-2 status was obtained is maintaining H-1 or L-1 status and the alien remains otherwise eligible for H-4 or L-2 sta tus, and, the alien is in possession of a valid H-4 or L-2 visa (if required) and the original copy of the I-797 receipt notice for the application for adjustment of status. The travel outside of the United States by an applicant for adjustment of status, who is not under exclusion, deportation, or removal proceeding and who is in lawful K-3 or K-4 status shall not be deemed an abandonment of the application if, upon returning to this country, the alien is in possession of a valid K-3 or K-4 visa and remain s eligible for K-3 or K-4 status. (Amended 8/14/01; 66 FR 42587 ) (Revised effective 4/1/97; 62 FR 10312 )

(D) The travel outside of the United States by an applicant for adjustment of status who is not under exclusion, deportation, or removal proceeding and who is in lawful V status shall not be deemed an abandonment of the application if, upon returning to this country, the alien is admissible as a V nonimmigrant. (Added 9/7/01; 66 FR 46697 )

(iii) Under the Act of November 2, 1966 . If an applicant who was admitted or paroled subsequent to January 1, 1959, later departs from the United States temporarily with no intention of abandoning his or her residence, and is readmitted or paroled upon return, the temporary absence shall be disregarded for purposes of the applicant’s “last arrival” into the United States in regard to cases filed under section 1 of the Act of November 2, 1966.

(5) Decision

(i) General . The applicant shall be notified of the decision of the director and, if the application is denied, the reasons for the denial. (Amended 7/1/94; 59 FR 33903 )

(ii) Under section 245 of the Act . If the application is approved, the applicant’s permanent residence shall be recorded as of the date of the order approving the adjustment of status. An application for adjustment of status, as a preference alien, shall not be approved until an immigrant visa number has been allocated by the Department of State, except when the applicant has established eligibility for the benefits of Public Law 101-238. No appeal lies from the denial of an application by the director, but the applicant, if not an arriv ing alien, retains the right to renew his or her application in proceedings under 8 CFR part 240. Also, an applicant who is a parolee and meets the two conditions described in § 245.2(a)(1) may renew a denied application in proceedings under 8 CFR part 240 to determine admissibility. At the time of renewal of the application, an applicant does not need to meet the statutory requirement of section 245(c) of the Act, or § 245.1(g), if, in fact, those requirements were met at the time the renewed application was initially filed with the director. Nothing in this section shall entitle an alien to proceedings under section 240 of the Act who is not otherwise so entitled. (Amended 7/1/94; 59 FR 33903 ) (Amended 10/1/94; 59 FR 51091 ) (Revised effective 4/1/97; 62 FR 10312 )

(iii) Under the Act of November 2, 1966 . If the application is approved, the applicant’s permanent residence shall be recorded in accordance with the provisions of section 1. No appeal lies from the denial of an application by the director, but the applicant, if not an arriving alien, retains the right to renew his or her application in proceedings under 8 CFR part 240 . Also, an applicant who is a parolee and meets the two conditions described in § 245.2(a)(1) may renew a denied application in proceedings under 8 CFR part 240 to determine admissibility. (Amended 7/1/94; 59 FR 33903 ) (Revised effective 4/1/97; 62 FR 10312 )

(b) Application under section 2 of the Act of November 2, 1966 . An application by a native or citizen of Cuba or by his spouse or child residing in the United States with him, who was lawfully admitted to the United States for permanent residence prior to November 2, 1966, and who desires such admission to be recorded as of an earlier date pursuant to section 2 of the Act of November 2, 1966, shall be made on Form I – 485A. The application shall be accompanied by the Permanent Resident Card, Form I – 151 or I – 551, issued to the applicant in connection with his lawf ul admission for permanent residence, and shall be submitted to the director having jurisdiction over the applicant’s place of residence in the United States. The decision on the application shall be made by the director. No appeal shall lie from his decision. If the application is approved, the applicant will be furnished with a replacement of his Form I – 151 or I – 551 bearing the new date as of which the lawful admission for permanent residence has been recorded. (Amended 7/1/94; 59 FR 33903 ) (Amended effective 1/20/99; 63 FR 70313 )

(c) Application under section 214(d) of the Act . An application for permanent resident status pursuant to section 214(d) of the Act shall be filed on Form I-485 with the director having jurisdiction over the applicant’s place of residence. A separate application shall be filed by each applicant. If the application is approved, the director shall record the lawful admission of the applicant as of the date of approval. The applicant shall be notified of the decision and, if the application is denied, of the reasons therefor. No appeal shall lie from the denial of an application by the director but such denial shall be witho ut prejudice to the alien’s right to renew his or her application in proceedings under 8 CFR part 240 . (Amended 7/1/94; 59 FR 33903 ) (Revised effective 4/1/97; 62 FR 10312 )

Undocumented Immigrants – How to Get a Credit Card to build Credit!

Posted on by Prerna in Immigration | Leave a comment

Apply for secured visa with Wells Fargo or Bank of America.

It helps if you have already been banking with them, have an ITIN, and a good household gross income. They would require a small initial deposit of about $300 and have high interest rates, but your ability to pay them off builds credit, which you need in this country, especially in the future when you could get legalized.

Scholarships for Law School

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ABA Legal Opportunity Scholarship
Application Deadline: March 1, 2008 (postmarked)
Application forms and guidelines: http://www.abanet.org/fje/losfpage.html

The ABA Legal Opportunity Scholarship Fund will award $5,000 of financial assistance annually to each scholarship recipient attending an ABA-accredited law school.  An award made to an entering first-year student may be renewable for two additional years, resulting in financial assistance totaling $15,000 during his or her time in law school.

American Intellectual Property Law Education Foundation – The Sidney B. Williams, Jr. Intellectual Property Law Scholarships
Application forms and guidelines: http://www.aiplef.org/scholarships/

The Foundation is awarding $10,000 Scholarships for Minority Scholars as well as arranging internships and mentorships to assist under-represented minority law school students entering intellectual property law.

American Association for Justice’s Minority Caucus – Richard D. Hailey AAJ Law Student Scholarships
Application Deadline: April 30, 2008
Application forms and guidelines: http://www.atla.org/networking/tier3/Hailey.aspx

These scholarships are open to all incoming first-, second-, and third-year African American, Hispanic, Asian American, Native American and Bi-Racial AAJ Law Student Members. Scholarships will be awarded to the applicants who best meet the criteria listed, but not limited to: 1. e xhibit an interest and proficiency of skills in trial advocacy; 2. express a desire to represent victims; 3. demonstrate a commitment to AAJ and dedication to its mission through involvement in an AAJ student chapter and Minority Caucus activities; 4. show a financial need for the scholarship. Up to six $1,000 tuition assistance scholarships will be awarded in the Fall of 2008.

American Society of International Law – Arthur C. Helton Fellowship Program
Application Deadline: February 15, 2008
Application forms and guidelines: http://www.asil.org/

Application instructions and eligibility guidelines for the Arthur C. Helton Fellowship Program are now available on the web site of The American Society of International Law at http://www.asil.org/aboutasil/heltonindex.html . Established in honor of Arthur C. Helton’s remarkable career advocating for refugees and his many contributions to international law, this program will assist students and young lawyers in need of modest sums (up to $1000) to pursue their first opportunities to engage in human rights work and research. The application deadline is February 15, 2008 and awards will be made by March 24, 2008. Only the first 50 completed applications submitted by the deadline will be considered for review and applicants may begin submitting applications begin, Monday, October 15, 2007. Please send all questions to fellowship@asil.org.

The Attorney-CPA Foundation Scholarships
Application Deadline: April 15, 2008
Application forms and guidelines: www.attorney-cpa.com/foundation

This scholarship is open to all law students who will be entering their third year of law school who have obtained a CPA certificate. Applicants will be evaluated based upon their academic performance, leadership in school and community and need for assistance in completing their studies. Scholarship applications should be post-marked by April 15, 2008. The recipients will be selected in July. The forms may be found online at www.attorney-cpa.com/foundation . The Foundation will award 14 scholarships in 2008 in amounts ranging from $250 to $1,000. If you have questions, please call the Attorney-CPA Foundation at 888-288-9272.

Berks County Community Foundation – The Howard Fox Memorial Law Scholarship
Application Deadline: April 1, 2008
Application forms and guidelines: http://www.bccf.org/pages/forms/Foxapplication.html

This $3,000 Scholarship is limited to Berks County , PA residents entering their second year of law school. The purpose of the fund is to provide scholarships to deserving Berks County residents entering their second year at an accredited law school, who demonstrate financial need, without discrimination to color, race, national origin or religion. No descendants of Leonard Quittner or M. Robert Ullman may be scholarship recipients. To be considered for this scholarship, complete and submit the form below electronically between January 15th and April 1.

Chicago Bar Foundation – Abraham Lincoln Marovitz Public Interest Law Scholarship
Application Deadline: April 15, 2008
Application forms and guidelines: http://www.chicagobarfoundation.org/abraham_llincoln_marovitz.html

The CBF’s Marovitz Scholarship is intended to support a needy law student who is deeply committed to public interest work so that upon graduation financial need will not prevent the student from pursuing a public interest legal career. The Scholarship provides funds for needy public interest-minded students so they may complete law school with as little debt as possible.

The CBF will award the scholarship annually to one student attending one of the nine Illinois law schools (Chicago-Kent, DePaul, John Marshall, Loyola, Northern Illinois University , Northwestern, Southern Illinois, University of Chicago and University of Illinois ). These funds, payable over a three-year period, will enable an incoming student who intends to pursue a career in public interest law to have a significant portion of his or her tuition and related expenses covered by Scholarship funding. Contingent on the recipient’s continued compliance with the terms of the Scholarship, the student will receive $5,000 in the first year of law school, $10,000 in the second year, and $15,000 in the third year. (The payment schedule may be modified for part-time students).

Davis-Putter Scholarship
Application Deadline: April 1, 2008
Application forms and guidelines: http://www.davisputter.org/apply.html

The first and most important qualification for a Davis-Putter Scholarship is active participation in struggles for civil rights, economic justice, international solidarity or other progressive issues. The applicant’s financial need and ability to perform academically are evaluated. Davis-Putter scholars are both graduate and undergraduate students and must be enrolled in an accredited school and receiving college credit for the time period covered by their grant. Completed applications must be postmarked by April 1 and will include a short personal statement, transcripts, letters of support from two people able to evaluate the applicant’s current political work, an official financial statement (i.e., FAFSA or SAR), and a passport-like photograph suitable for reproduction. The maximum grant is $6,000 and may be considerably smaller depending on the applicant’s circumstances and the amount of funding available.

Food and Drug Law Institute – H. Thomas Austern Memorial Writing Competitions
Application Deadline: June 13, 2008
Application forms and guidelines: http://www.fdli.org/academic/hthomas.html

The Food and Drug Law Institute is committed to providing high quality education and a neutral forum for the generation of ideas and discussion of law and public policy for its legal, policy and regulatory communities. The Food and Drug Law Institute (FDLI) sponsors the Writing Competitions to encourage law students interested in the areas of law that affect foods, drugs, devices, cosmetics, and biologics. Winning papers will be considered for publication in the Food and Drug Law Journal . There are two competitions—one for papers with a maximum of 40 pages, and one for papers between 41 and 100 pages. Papers longer than 100 pages will not be accepted. Two prizes will be awarded for each of the two competitions ranging from $1000 – $1500.

Foundation for Community Association Research – Byron Hanke Fellowship
Application Deadline: Open
Application forms and guidelines: http://www.cairf.org/scholarships/hanke.aspx

The Byron Hanke Fellowship is available to graduate students working on topics related to community associations. Community associations govern common-interest communities of any kind—condominiums, cooperatives, townhouse developments, planned unit developments, and other developments where homeowners support an association with mandatory financial assessments, and are subject to use and aesthetic restrictions. The Hanke Fellowship stipends range from $2,000-$4,000. The Foundation Executive Committee maintains the right to determine the amount of the stipend. Fellows are expected to prepare a research paper on community associations. For more information, contact the Foundation at (888) 224-4321 or foundation@caionline.org .

Hellenic Bar Association of Illinois
Application Deadline: October 5, 2007
Application forms and guidelines: http://www.hellenicbar.org/

Scholarships awarded to students of Hellenic descent in amounts typically ranging from $1,000 to $2,500.

Iranian American Bar Association
Application Deadline: Summer 2008
Application forms and guidelines: http://www.iaba.us/IABA/Content.aspx?pg=2-3

IABA ( http://www.iaba.us/ ) issues one or more scholarships each year to law students in good standing enrolled in an accredited law school in the United States . IABA typically invites applications for its scholarship in the spring of each year and announces the award(s) during the ensuing summer. The grantees are selected by the Scholarship Committee. The award amount varies depending on the organization’s financial resources, but IABA has for several years now always set aside funds in an amount at least $2,000 annually to fund the scholarship program. The scholarships are designed to recognize the commitment of law students to the advancement of the Iranian American community. The awards are aimed at helping those students who have no access to other external funding sources; accordingly, students who are receiving full funding for education from another organization are not eligible.

Inter-Pacific Bar Association (IPBA) Scholarship
Application Deadline: October 31, 2007 (postmarked)
Application forms and guidelines: http://www.ipba.org/about/scholarship.htm .

The Inter-Pacific Bar Association (“IPBA”) is an international association of business and commercial lawyers with a focus on the Asia-Pacific region.  The IPBA is offering a Scholarship for Young Lawyers and a scholarship for Lawyers from Developing Countries. Application Forms for both categories must be returned to the IPBA Secretariat in Tokyo no later than October 31, 2007. For information on up-to-date eligibility criteria and on application procedures and deadlines, please contact the IPBA Secretariat at ipba@tga.co.jp . Details about the Scholarships including eligibility criteria and Application Forms can be found on the IPBA Website in the IPBA Scholarship section at: http://www.ipba.org/about/scholarship.htm .

Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund – Law School Scholarship
Application Deadline: October 5, 2007
Application forms and guidelines: http://www.maldef.org/education/scholarships.htm

The MALDEF Law School Scholarship offers financial assistance to qualified individuals in pursuit of higher education. Each year, MALDEF awards numerous law school scholarships to deserving students entering their first, second or third year of law school. Scholarships range up to $7,000 per individual. The MALDEF scholarships will be awarded to candidates who have outstanding academic records, including participation and leadership in extracurricular activities.

The Point Foundation
Application Deadline: March 1, 2008
Application forms and guidelines: http://www.thepointfoundation.org/

The application process is open to all LGBT students nationwide and a Point Scholarship covers tuition, books, supplies, room and board, transportation and living expenses, and is set up with the individual college to meet the needs of the Point Scholar. In exchange, all Point Scholars agree to maintain a high level of academic performance and give back to the LGBT community through the completion of an individual community service project. Each Point Scholar makes a personal investment in their own future by either working while studying or acquiring debt to help finance their education.

Serbian Bar Association of America
Application Deadline: October 1, 2007
Application forms and guidelines: http://www.serbbar.org/scholarship/

All persons of Serbian birth, ancestry or connubial relationship who are enrolled in an accredited law school in any state of the United States of America are eligible for the SBAA’s annual scholarships. Scholarship amounts range from $500 to $2,000.

Darleen J. and Robert L. Walker Scholarship Fund
Application Deadline: June 30, 2007
Application forms and guidelines: http://www.walkerscholarship.org/

T he Darleen J. and Robert L. Walker Scholarship Fund is established to provide financial assistance to students studying law or about to enter law school in Illinois or the areas of Milwaukee , Wisconsin or St. Louis , Missouri . While scholarships are open to all, strong preference is given to applicants who are Masons, who come from Masonic families or are former residents of the Masonic Children’s Home in LaGrange , IL . Contact info@walkerscholarship.org with further questions.

Where is all this leading to?

Posted on by Prerna in Education | Leave a comment

The question arises at 2am while studying for the ridiculous LSATs on a U.S. national holiday, why am I doing this to myself? Do I really think I will be rewarded after all my years of struggle? For whom am I doing this? Is another worthless degree really going to make my life better? That’s essentially what all my degrees are – pieces of paper that are worthless. They look great hanging on the wall and serve as placeholders, with no real utility value. I try to concentrate on the prepbook questions and yet my mind keeps coming back to just one question, playing over and over in my head: “why did they do this me? why did they do this to me? why did they do this to me?…”

I am afraid I will never find a logical, rational and educated answer. There are no logical, rational and educated answers for illogical, irrational and uneducated actions. They only have grave and dire consequences for the innocent people that are targets of those actions.

And like in any war, the perpetrators walk away freely and merrily. Enveloped in despair and ruin, the victims helplessly watch their world falling apart. Their only tool is a pen, and with it they embark on a journey to the horizon…

Unreported World – India – The Broken people

Posted on by Prerna in Videos | Leave a comment

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Alright, which employers give work-related visas in International Relations, Political Science, Pre-Law and related fields?

Posted on by Prerna in Immigration | Leave a comment

International Relations, Political Science, Pre-Law and related fields.

EB-2 Visas for Advanced Degrees and Exceptional Abilities Explained

Organizations that would hire non-U.S. nationals:

  • Humans Rights Watch

It says on every professional-level job that “HRW will pay reasonable relocation expenses and will assist employees in obtaining necessary work authorization, if required; citizens of all nationalities are encouraged to apply.”

The UN also hires according to nationality if you pass their comprenhesive examinations and testing.

I will search for more, now that I know the keywords.

The United Nations also likes non-US citizen nationals. Of course, most jobs require several years of professional-level experience.

And so, national security is diametrically opposed to human security

Posted on by Prerna in Discourse Studies, Nationalism, Politics | Leave a comment

Lets see. Critical Security Studies has been a prime interest since I was 16 years old and running the Terror Talk/Threat Construction Kritik at policy debate tournaments. I won rounds solely on the basis of this — I remember my debate coach once remarked that I never ever used “the threat of Islamic terrorists” or any such discourse to win any rounds no matter what. It may have cost me on several occasions but that is all in the past. I graduated and let the Threat Con file sit and gather dust for 3 years until I finally used it as a final paper for my Undergrad. This is possible Doctorate level work that I am not keen on pursuing at this point for obvious reasons. It reminds me that I am too smart and intellectual for law school. I also tend to think it is a DUH. Can you believe someone won the Nobel prize for writing that poverty and terrorism were related? Goodness, that’s just common sense and I have been writing that since I was 15! Where is my Nobel prize yo?! Actually you keep the Nobel Prize, just hand me a Green card, will you?! :)

Anyway, excerpts are in order. Whole paper is here

The discursive speech acts embodied in various National Security Strategy documents establish that the act of securing the American people has given way to the politicization of national security. Politicization refers to the employment of national security discourse for political ends and not specifically for meeting the actual security needs of civil society. Starting with President Truman’s NSC-68 document in 1950 and continuing up to Bush II in the present day, the discourse of national security strategy has been systematically cemented on the national policy agenda, employed for purposes other than the security of the American people. Upon a thorough examination of these documents, a central theme that emerges and dictates United States foreign policy is the pervasive construction of an enemy, an external “Other” as a threat to national security. I argue that this security discourse functions as a tool for identity construction and reification of the American state apparatus with far-reaching consequences: an increasing politicization of security, legitimization of a permanent war economy, the oppression and marginalization of minority groups, omission of key security issues from the security agenda, and paradoxically, a more insecure, unstable America and global order. Therefore, the goal of this paper is to deconstruct the totalizing and unitary narrative of the National Security Strategy documents under Truman, Bush I, Clinton and Bush II, and unearth counter-narratives that challenge dominant security discourses based on ideological threat construction. I conclude that the main objectives set out in NSC-68 continue to govern US foreign policy even in the post-Cold War era, that American foreign policy today mirrors American foreign policy post-World War II: a search for identity and power, which ironically leads to more insecurity for Americans and for the entire world.”